Community Economic Development Fund

interviewing

Are you looking for traits or skills?

Here’s a simple, yet misunderstood concept. Before interviewing candidates for employment be sure to evaluate which traits are important for the position. Traits by definition are particular characteristics, a fixed mindsets, or inherited patterns that are unlikely to change. Therefore, when seeking a candidate do not accept a trait that will not work in your business. It is undoubtedly preferable to continue searching for a better-fitting applicant if you cannot check off all the boxes for the traits you are looking for. If all the desirable traits are present, and only skills are absent, you may still have a promising prospect.

Skills are different. An applicant may be capable of learning a specific skill or developing a skill sets required for productive employment. If an employer is willing to access the multitude of training and educational sources available and patient enough to wait for development to occur, then new employees can be well on their way to achieving the expectations required of them.

Once, while interviewing a 16-year-old man for a busboy position with relatively little work experience, I saw he displayed traits I was seeking: determination, honesty, cooperativeness -- and everything else I was looking for in the character of a new employee. Because I saw the foundation we needed to build upon, I hired him. Knowing he had few skills for the job, I was prepared to teach him the skills he needed to be successful. Not only did he learn how to do the job, he surpassed the minimum requirements of the position he was hired for, eventually training his own replacement. For more than three years, this young man worked productively, continually learning and exceeding my expectations. All I had to provide to him were the skills to succeed.

There’s a great article here that expands on this topic, especially useful information for the interviewing process.

Inexperienced managers overlook this concept in the interviewing process. In order to avoid wasted money for the employer and disappointment and wasted time for both employer and candidates, it is worth the diligence to search for the correct candidate for your business from the beginning.

-- Jennifer Avallone, CEDF business advisor

Have you wasted as much money as I have?

by Frederick Welk, CEDF Business Advisor

Many of my food service and retail clients know about my weakness for Chick-Fil-A sandwiches and my admiration for their outstanding customer service training. I wanted to share a revelation about recruiting that makes perfect sense for not just quick service restaurants, where labor conditions are perpetually tight, but in any industry where hiring is a challenge.A pile of money

Those of us who have owned or managed businesses for long enough have tossed aside uncountable numbers of applications that, at a glance, are unsuitable. To paraphrase a song by the Eurythmics: If I had a dollar for all of the resumes I’ve discarded, there’d be a mountain of money piled up to my chin.

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